Molecular networks underlying Treg suppressor function

CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ T cells, also known as T regulatory cells (Tregs), play a key role in maintaining tolerance and homeostasis of tissues and the immune system. Treg dysregulation is key in various pathologic conditions such as in autoimmune diseases, allergic diseases, infectious diseases, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and metabolic inflammation (He et al., 2012;He and Balling, 2013). In many of these common chronic diseases, the fine-tuned Treg suppressing system is out of balance, and regulation of Treg function is seen as a promising approach to treatment of these diseases. Therefore, it is essential to understand the precise molecular mechanisms underlying Treg suppressor function under homeostatic and pathological conditions. In the GISB, we use network-guided approaches to predict potential candidate genes and the underlying molecular networks from large-scale time-series data of human primary Tregs. We then combine human primary T cells and mice knockout models to validate and delineate the function of those potential candidate genes and molecular networks in homeostasis and diseased conditions.

 

Fundings

FNR CORE, FNR AFR, LUXEMBOURG-RIKEN Bilateral program

undefined
Network-guided Treg key gene discovery